Miley Cyrus Admits Drug Lyrics

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Smiley Miley has been working hard to shed her good girl image and kill the innocent "Hannah Montana" of Disney fame.

Her butt-shaking, pseudo-pornographic dance at the MTV Video Music Awards – where we all learned a new word, "twerking" – was one example, and now she’s cleared up some confusion about a new song. Despite what her producers have said, the song really is about taking ecstasy.

Cyrus admits to referencing ecstasy

Thinly veiled to begin with, the song "We Can’t Stop" is an upbeat description of partying all night and includes lyrics that might be referencing drug use:

"And everyone in line in the bathroom
Trying to get a line in the bathroom
We all so turned up here
Getting turned up, yeah, yeah”

But so what? Lots of songs are about drugs. The controversy centered around a line in the chorus: "Dancing with Miley.” At least, that’s what producers said it was. After all, they want to get air play for their product. But the line can be heard another way: "Dancing with Molly.”

"Molly” is a street name for ecstasy, an amphetamine-like drug that all-night partiers use for the intense emotional feelings and energy it gives. So which was it? Cyrus now says, "If you're aged 10 [the lyric is] Miley. If you know what I'm talking about then you know. I just wanted it to be played on the radio and they've already had to edit it so much."

In the grand scheme of things, a drug reference in a popular song doesn’t rank very high. What’s more upsetting is that Cyrus seems to feel that trading her wholesome image in for a hyper-sexualized, drug-fueled party animal is a goal worth pursuing. Is that what it takes to sell records in 2013? Maybe it is. The real tragedy only becomes obvious when a young and healthy songstress flies too close to the flame for too long and ends up in a cycle of rehab, scandal and possibly death. Let’s hope this isn’t the road she’s traveling. Let’s hope it’s all just a pretense to sell records.

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